The Rating Race Begins

It’s almost 1:00 in the afternoon already and I swear I only intended to spend a half hour updating by Cry Baby Cry website. The thing, is, though, that in the process of doing that, I discovered the book had received its first 5-star rating on Goodreads, which resulted in a whole flurry of postings and updates on all my websites and social media venues.

Then, just as I thought I could go throw a load of clothes in the washer, a five star review on Amazon popped up and ZOOM, there I am, off again. I promise, though that this will be my last update of the day (unless I discover more reviews and ratings later on!).

The first 5-stars came from  Sheri Wilkerson on Goodreads:

The second one was posed on Amazon by Marydale S. and comes with some wonderful accolades.

This is a page-turner by a seasoned author. I especially like the fact that this author not only writes from experience (she has been a volunteer worker among homeless youth) but also from and with compassion. Her books are more than entertainment; they teach us tolerance and awareness of lives that aren’t conventional, easy, or “socially acceptable.” A worthwhile read!

Thanks to Sheri and Marydale. And I look forward to hearing what YOU think of it, too. Let me know.

Review: Gritty but Ultimately Good

I was nicely surprised this morning to find a tweet from Chicago Book Review linking to a review of Box of Rain.

The Chicago Book Review posted an awesome review this morning of Box of Rain. Click the link at the end to read the whole wonderful thing, but here are some of my favorite quotes:

“Box of Rain is the third in a series of “Street Stories” suspense novels focusing on the gritty side of Chicago. In this briskly paced story, Debra Borys weaves together two narratives: one about a young black man falsely suspected of murder and on the run from police, the other about a reporter on the case as she grapples with her father’s dubious past.”

This quick-paced, sometimes dark, but ultimately good-hearted novel aims for light entertainment with a straightforward message, not unlike the spirited Chicago detective novels of Sarah Paretsky.

“The characters are lightly but clearly sketched in their precarious situations and there are several nuanced angles to the story. For instance, not all of the people striving to help these young men are thoroughly “good.” Many show traces of both compassion and stubbornness or even ruthless greed. The young men themselves are far from perfect. The police show both concern and callousness. The reporter has more than her share of doubts about the young men; she is not their unfailing champion. Personal problems leave her irritable and sharp-tongued—a possible hindrance in her investigation. All this adds up to poor odds for a young man mired in a major criminal case.

This quick-paced, sometimes dark, but ultimately good-hearted novel aims for light entertainment with a straightforward message, not unlike the spirited Chicago detective novels of Sarah Paretsky. Box of Rain will not surprise those familiar with the problems between young black men and law enforcement. But with its tightly knit plot and a few good twists, this novel may be recommended for YA and general readers curious about how unconscious biases can lead to vicious cycles of distrust.”

From Chicago Book Review:  Gritty but Ultimately Good-Hearted